We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, ‘You can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful, but not too successful. Otherwise you will threaten the man.’ Because I am female, I am expected to aspire to marriage. I am expected to make my life choices always keeping in mind that marriage is the most important. Now marriage can be a source of joy and love and mutual support. But why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys the same? We raise girls to see each other as competitors – not for jobs or for accomplishments, which I think can be a good thing, but for the attention of men. We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are.

We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, ‘You can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful, but not too successful. Otherwise you will threaten the man.’ Because I am female, I am expected to aspire to marriage. I am expected to make my life choices always keeping in mind that marriage is the most important. Now marriage can be a source of joy and love and mutual support. But why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys the same? We raise girls to see each other as competitors – not for jobs or for accomplishments, which I think can be a good thing, but for the attention of men. We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are.

On Saturday, my uncle tapped me for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.  Unfortunately, I was without a camera operator at the time.  We wedged it into a day of fun yesterday with friends in Austin.

I’d like to challenge Michael O’Malley (my boss), Chelsea Stockton (muh lady), and Josef Bodine (the man rather vigorously hitting me in the ear with ice.).  Don’t forget to donate and pick your three.

For Fun: Two truths and a Lie.

My greatest aspiration as a five year old child was to be a paleontology and to every one I told that I had to explain the meaning of the word.

I founded a non-profit in college which I now find distasteful and needless. It was a scholarship incorporated under The Vega Society.

I grew up under the eye of a kind but exceedingly judgmental and coarse sect of Christianity. I was uncomfortable wearing shots until well into adulthood.

A Writerly Howdyado

I’ve taken a few breaks from writing lately. First, and most significantly, I took the month of the Cup off. That time encompassed some strange feelings, not least among them the realization of just how easy it is to break a year and a half old habit. Less surprising was the want to get back to things. Phew.

I’ve also broken from writing quite so many updates on the status of the series and now that I’ve hit a new new, I’d like to take this moment.

Coming out of the month’s hiatus, I reread the entirety of the second books. Lots of issues to address and few of them fun, but I took copious notes and set it aside again. I know with absolute certainty that I will regret this in some fashion. I want to get all three novels, the current one included, into a near second draft stage before I set into the bulk of edits. If it is a mistake—as it feels—its one I am going into consciously. That much massive editing, just six months or so in the future, does not promise great fun, but I want a tight thematic arch across the trilogy and I don’t think I’ll find it satisfactory if I rush into the novels too quickly. I’m all the time figuring out what they’re actually about.

After that, I spent a little time crafting a story out of a couple of Writing Excuses exercise as a way of getting into something a bit more fun after the read-through.

For the past two weeks, I’ve sketched characters, made rough plot lines, and bulleted significant milieu changes I wish to institute in the final book of the series. I decided to give myself exactly two weeks, no more or less, and also to allow for a bit more discovery in this final volume. I’ve only very loosely plotted the first nine or so chapters.

But that does not constitute a great enough change to get me writing about writing again. Rather, it’s the will, perhaps the wish, to procrastinate. I’d hesitate to point to any particular states of mind or body that might be provoking this, but for the past week I’ve actually found legitimately difficult to begin writing in the morning. I have plans, I leave the story where I know the next few steps, I think periodically about what comes in the next few paces, yet when I sit down almost anything else will do. I’ve never experienced this before in work I do for myself and it’s not specific to writing—I’ve been putting off certification studying as well—but it is certainly worse in this than in other endeavors.

Hoping it passes or that at the very least routine wins the day.

Are you a procrastinator and if so, how does it affect you?  Is it manageable?  Is it regular?  What exacerbates it?

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EDIT: Immediately upon finishing this post, I recalled a Salon post from this morning and went back and deleted all double spaces following periods. Follow-up question: How many of you double space needlessly because of confusing or flat out incorrect instruction as a student?

Narrow Roles for Leading Ladies - Saldana Edition

As I said, I loved Guardians of the Galaxy.  My lady and I went together and we both did.  Maybe me a little more, but superheroes and space opera?  Definitely more my thing.

Chelsea had just one bone to pick and it regarded Zoe Saldana.  Nothing bad about her Guardian performance, exactly, but a trend in her career that she finds problematic.  In Avatar, both recent Star Trek films, and Guardians, she seems to play a bad ass lady in very much the same way.  Hair, attitude, personality, gender relations, they all seem to be pretty much the same.  And Zoe Saldana is a traditionally attractive woman.  None of this is bad per say, but it augments a long standing archetype in how Hollywood portrays its few leading women.  Rather than embracing modern popular cinema as an opportunity to broaden how women are portrayed on the screen, the shallow range of leading women advances and cements the same old expectations and pigeon-holes women, young and old alike, into the same old roles rather than let them branch out and—I dunno—maybe flesh out the vast variety of women that actually exist.

Fast forward one week.  We both work in jobs that allow a little spare time on Fridays and she sent me this as illustration of others sharing the same view, specifically in regards to Zoe Saldana.  I rather enjoyed the brief conversation that followed and below is an edited version.

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Me:

Perfect and on point.  The thing about James Cameron asking if people wanted to “do” the Avatar ladies is disgusting but maybe there is some small benefit in his being explicit.  So much of this male gaze crap comes from people who think they’re operating on some higher social plane and then we still only get traditionally attractive bad ass ladies, to say nothing of other female or neuter archetypes.

Orange is the New Black did a really great job with their casting.  Lots of body and personality types and people all over the range in terms of traditional attractiveness.  And everyone loves that show.  I wish Hollywood would tune into our non-reptilian brains and see that we like stories about people, not stories about (and for) dudes.

Chels:

I feel if anything, in playing the same “other” (aka female alien) over and over she has actually LIMITED our view on women, not broadened. Women = hot, feisty, sexualized aliens. You can easily transpose that stereotype with our portrayal as women as witches, bosses, etc. There is nothing new here, and it’s just reinforcing it as we try to change it. I appreciate her enjoyment of the role, but she is not expanding any horizons on the female front.

Me:

Maybe fan conversations can start to change that.  Though, I don’t know how engaged with fan Zoe Saldana is.

Chels:

The other day I was thinking about A Million Ways to Die in the West, and if the story hadn’t been strictly satire of the Western film genre, Anna could have been a legitimate, fully-rounded, authentic female role. She’s not necessarily a tomboy (although they do a lot to make her contrast against Louise), and she’s not necessarily a “girly girl.” She’s feminine and masculine, sweet and upfront, witty and vulnerable. She pairs well with the male lead not because she’s a woman and there, but because they have honest chemistry and develop a realistic relationship over time. It’s believable. I was impressed by that.

Me:

I agree.  She was really interesting and broke my expectations a couple of times.

Now that I think about it, Seth MacFarlane usually does good job at playing with stereotypes and gender expectations to subvert them without relying purely on cheap jokes.  He has good co-writers and works with lots of different people, aggregating their ideas into his very popular style.  It can be hard to see in single episodes of his shows, which often make terribly sexist (or other -ist) jokes without explanation.  Over the arch of his characters, though, he shows a lot of respect for difference.

Not all the time, of course.  There are times when purely sexist or religious jokes go too far without much promise.  It’s really a shame A Million Ways wasn’t a better film because character-wise it was pretty strong.  Only maybe 3 or 4 full characters, but that can be rare for even the best comedies.

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We do women and men alike a disservice by showing either through a shallow, greased lens.  Time and again, media consumers show that they want a plurality of voices and, even more so, that they don’t need their hands held through exposure to new ideas.  Guardians of the Galaxy was great.  Let’s make the sequel even better.  Better yet, let’s apply the women-are-human-beings-too mantra to all popular cinema.  I bet it won’t hurt too much.

##The Day We Fight Back code ##/The Day We Fight Back code